Customer Loyalty Seminar Invite 6-29-2011

June 23, 2011

Advertisements

Customer Loyalty Strategy

May 28, 2011

Hi everyone,

Sorry it’s been too long since our last post but we have been busy doing seminars. We hope to update our blog a little more frequently.

I was on linked in yesterday and saw a discussion started with a question on what are people using as attributes to enhance their “Customer Loyalty Strategy”. I was a little surprised by some of the responses. The idea of customer loyalty seems to be some card you keep on your key chain or a reward you give your employee for taking care of a customer. From the responses I read I have come to the conclusion that these programs are not too successful. That should come as no surprise!

Customer Loyalty is not today’s program in hopes of driving repeat business. Customer Loyalty is the ability of your employees to make that emotional connection with a customer. So how do we define an emotional connection? An emotional connection is different for every individual. It is the connection with a customer that is deeper than just meeting the expectation. That is what the competition does. It’s going beyond that! So how do you teach it? You can’t! It’s a development process that starts with the culture of your business. It starts with the business owner and trickles down to all the employees.

An example of that emotional connection can be a visit to a restaurant. You can go to the restaurant have a quality meal,pay a fair price and leave without a bad experience. The restaurant was successful satisfying you, nothing more,nothing less. Will that experience drive you back for a future visit? Maybe. Let’s say you go to that same restaurant and you run into a server that is really good with people. Starts up a conversation makes you feel relaxed,recommends an exceptional meal, the complete experience is beyond belief. When you’re on your way out the door getting in your car you just say to yourself, WOW! That is what drives customer loyalty!

The next time you make a decision of where to dine where do you think you are going? Back to the same restaurant and you’ll probably ask for the same server! That is how you can get a Loyalty Strategy in your business. Loyalty is built by having a Loyalty strategy built in your Strategic Plan, a Loyalty Strategy within your leadership, A Loyalty process and Loyal employees. When looking at your business these all need to be developed and implemented.

Why should a business owner pay so much attention to developing this strategy? According to Fred Reichold author of “The Ultimate Question,” a 5% improvement in customer retention can improve profits up to 100%. The best way to improve customer retention is by developing a Loyalty Strategy.

Loyalty Solutions is getting ready to launch Customer Loyalty Seminars in June. We’ll have more information to follow. If you would like to get more details feel free to contact either Bill Griffith at billgriff9@att.net or Jeff Johnstone at jeff@goaladvantage.com or Ocie Irons at ocie@ironbridgedev.com.


Customer Loyalty Strategy

May 26, 2011

Hi everyone,

Sorry it’s been too long since our last post but we have been busy doing seminars. We hope to update our blog a little more frequently.

I was on linked in yesterday and saw a discussion started with a question on what are people using as attributes to enhance their “Customer Loyalty Strategy”. I was a little surprised by some of the responses. The idea of customer loyalty seems to be some card you keep on your key chain or a reward you give your employee for taking care of a customer. From the responses I read I have come to the conclusion that these programs are not too successful. That should come as no surprise!

Customer Loyalty is not today’s program in hopes of driving repeat business. Customer Loyalty is the ability of your employees to make that emotional connection with a customer. So how do we define an emotional connection? An emotional connection is different for every individual. It is the connection with a customer that is deeper than just meeting the expectation. That is what the competition does. It’s going beyond that! So how do you teach it? You can’t! It’s a development process that starts with the culture of your business. It starts with the business owner and trickles down to all the employees.

An example of that emotional connection can be a visit to a restaurant. You can go to the restaurant have a quality meal,pay a fair price and leave without a bad experience. The restaurant was successful satisfying you, nothing more,nothing less. Will that experience drive you back for a future visit? Maybe. Let’s say you go to that same restaurant and you run into a server that is really good with people. Starts up a conversation makes you feel relaxed,recommends an exceptional meal, the complete experience is beyond belief. When you’re on your way out the door getting in your car you just say to yourself, WOW! That is what drives customer loyalty!

The next time you make a decision of where to dine where do you think you are going? Back to the same restaurant and you’ll probably ask for the same server! That is how you can get a Loyalty Strategy in your business. Loyalty is built by having a Loyalty strategy built in your Strategic Plan, a Loyalty Strategy within your leadership, A Loyalty process and Loyal employees. When looking at your business these all need to be developed and implemented.

Why should a business owner pay so much attention to developing this strategy? According to Fred Reichold author of “The Ultimate Question,” a 5% improvement in customer retention can improve profits up to 100%. The best way to improve customer retention is by developing a Loyalty Strategy.

Loyalty Solutions is getting ready to launch Customer Loyalty Seminars in June. We’ll have more information to follow. If you would like to get more details feel free to contact either Bill Griffith at billgriff9@att.net or Jeff Johnstone at jeff@goaladvantage.com or Ocie Irons at ocie@ironbridgedev.com.


Measuring Customer Loyalty Seminar April 5th at 8 AM.

April 1, 2011

Customer
Loyalty Seminar II :

Measuring Customer Loyalty

“The greater the loyalty of a group toward the
group, the greater is the motivation among the members to achieve the goals of
the group, and the greater the probability that the group will achieve its
goals.”
– Rensis Likert –

How do you measure Customer Loyalty?

Key Measurements for Building a Loyal Customer Base

This two-hour
workshop focuses on:

  • How does your organization measure CUSTOMER LOYALTY?
  • Why is it important to know your LOYALTY FACTOR SCORE?
  • What is your LOYALTY FACTOR SCORE?
  • Why is it important to know your EMPLOYEE LOYALTY SCORE?
  • What is your EMPLOYEE LOYALTY SCORE?

Loyalty Solutions Seminar April 5th at

Heritage Church

44625 Schoenherr Rd.

Sterling Heights MI. 48313

8:00 AM until 11:00

$50.00 Payable at the door

Please RSVP to Bill Griffith At billgriff9@att.net or 586-431-9311

 

 

 

 



 

 

 


Seminar March 15th 2011: Sustained Profitabilty by Developing a Customer Loyalty Strategy

March 11, 2011

Starts: TuesdayMarch 15,2011, 08:00AM EDT
Ends: Tuesday March 15,2011 11:00AM EDT
Event Type: Training/Seminar
Location: Heritage Church
44625 Schoenherr Rd
Sterling Heights, MI 48313 US
Price: $50 in advance ($55 at the door)
Website: http://www.loyaltysolutions365.wordpress.com
Industry:
Keywords: customer satisfaction, customer loyalty, business
Intended For: Business owners, Executives, General Manager, CEO, Director of Marketing, COO, Customer Service Manager
Organization: Loyalty Solutions

Developing a Customer Loyalty Strategy This workshop focuses on: Customer Satisfaction vs. Customer Loyalty, Perceived Value as defined by Customers, Why your company would want loyal customers, Customer Loyalty Strategy.

$50 in advance, $55 at the door. To register contact Bill Griffith at (586) 431-9311 or billgriff9@att.net.

Workshop presented by Loyalty Solutions, a collaborative effort of Goal Advantage, Ironbridge Development, and WJG Business Concepts


Managing Stress

February 17, 2011

Managing Stress

Posted: 09 Feb 2011 05:25 AM PST

Excellent customer service providers are in tune with the emotions of the people they deal with through awareness and empathy. They’re proficient at handling conflicts, and they have the ability to maintain positive attitudes while engaged in their work. However, a continual barrage of negative customer interactions can be a reality within the role of service providers, and they can cause what is commonly called emotional labor.

Arlie Hochschild, author of The Managed Heart: Communication of Human Feeling, defines emotional labor as displaying a set of emotions that differ from the emotions the service provider is currently feeling. Based on this definition, people in service jobs who are acting differently than they are feeling can experience high doses of emotional labor which can cause stress, fatigue, and diminished impulse control.

Service providers deal with a higher level of stress no matter what product or service they provide due to the fact that customer interactions are always fueled with many types of emotions. Stress is a physical reaction that you experience when you cannot cope or have difficulty dealing with a negative or threatening situation. Due to the direct connection between a service provider’s role and stressful situation, learning how to understand, manage, and reduce stress becomes an important skill to master.

In the book Stress Management for Dummies, author Allen Elkin cites:

7 out 19 people felt stress at some point on a typical workday.
People reported that they lost their temper an average of 5 times a month.
Many people reported that stress contributes to doing things they regret later.
About 5% of those asked said stress was preventing them from enjoying their lives.
People under stress tend to be more on edge and will erupt more quickly and violently, increasing their number of conflicts with people in general. Extreme stress saps your energy because your body is functioning in emergency mode. Stress tightens your muscles, impacts your breathing and the flow of oxygen to your vital organs, and it can cause sleep to be difficult. High stress can put a strain on many of your bodily functions and can lead to high blood pressure, ulcers, and heart attacks. It can become a vicious cycle. Obviously, reducing stress can have many health benefits as well as making your life more enjoyable and rewarding. It is important to identify what pushes your buttons and produces stress in your life. Identifying your stress producers is the first step in effectively managing and reducing stress.

In order to effectively manage stress, you must build or increase your tolerance for stress. Stress management is your ability to deal effectively with adverse events and stressful situations without falling apart. Having a positive outlook on new experiences and change is also important. Plus the ability to stay calm and maintain control in stressful situations is a large part of building an increased tolerance level. People who excel at stress management tend to face crises and problems head on with a positive attitude rather than surrendering to feelings of helplessness, hopelessness, and self-doubt.

The first step is to understand where the stress is coming from or what events are activating the stressful feelings you are experiencing. Check out next week’s blog for more on reducing and eliminating stress.

Tammy A.S. Kohl is President of Resource Associates Corporation. For over 30 years, RAC has specialized in helping businesses and individuals achieve high levels of excellence and success. Learn how at http://www.resourceassociatescorp.com


Get Emotional to Create Loyal Customers

January 21, 2011

You have probably heard that most buying decisions are not based on a need but rather on an emotion. Most people can get to their destinations in a Chevrolet just as easily as they can in a Mercedes. They need transportation from Point A to Point B. But an emotion (pride, for example) would motivate a rising executive to purchase a Mercedes which might make a statement about her status in life. And, recognizing this, the Mercedes dealer dealership has policies and processes that focus on satisfying their customer’s need to satisfy that pride. This requires that they know the customer…understand her motivations…meet and surpass her expectations. But it also requires that the dealership management communicates that creating and maintaining an emotional connection is of high importance.

My associates and I recently completed a customer loyalty seminar in which we discussed the difference between customer loyalty and customer satisfaction. A loyal customer is more likely to:
o Return to your business without the need for incentives
o Refer your business via word of mouth
o Are willing to pay more for your product/service
o Are more forgiving of your company’s errors
A satisfied customer, on the other hand, will be more likely to change companies or products to take advantage of a sale, coupon, or some other incentive. A company has only met the expectations of its satisfied customers. In particular, the company/product/service has met the customer’s minimum requirements.

You might be satisfied flying ABC Airlines. Its flights served the markets that you wanted to travel between. ABC Airlines got you to your destination safely and on time. Your knees were sore from being pressed up against the back of the seat in front of you but then again, at 6’5” tall you have gotten used to that. ABC met your expectations. But for the mere price of more frequent flyer points or a free car rental you might choose XYZ Air for your next trip. What would be an emotional connection that would cause you to be loyal to ABC? Consider the story I recently saw from Time.com (http://bit.ly/ehyBhB). To summarize, a passenger trying to make a flight connection in order to attend the funeral of a family member was clearly running late. He was going to miss the connecting flight as a result of circumstances beyond his control. The pilot of that connecting flight learned of his situation and held the flight for him. The grieving passenger, expecting to miss the connector and thus the funeral, was obviously grateful. We can assume the pilot empathized with the passenger and that the stressed traveler had his expectations exceeded. I think it is also a fair bet that if that airline serves the routes this passenger travels in the future, he is going to fly with them. So the airline likely established an emotional connection with this customer during this interaction with the pilot who waited for him. An emotional connection was created.

The article uses the word hero to describe the empathetic pilot. It mentions the risk he took of angering waiting passengers or running afoul of airline performance standards. I do not think his risk was especially high though. And I don’t mean any disrespect in saying this. I believe that the airline has created an environment in which loyal employees feel empowered to create memorable customer interactions. They pay attention to the customers’ needs and emotions…and their own. And in the process they create emotional connections resulting in a reputation for high customer service and loyalty. They have institutionalized a set of values and a corporate vision that makes the pilots action less risky. The company set strategies designed to focus on meeting customer needs and exceeding expectations. At critical points of connection the airline’s customers experience memorable interactions. They have created a strategy designed to generate loyal customers.

If you are interested in learning more about how your organization might benefit from a customer loyalty strategy please contact us.

Ocie Irons / ocie@ironbridgedev.com / (248) 231-2210

Bill Griffith / billgriff9@att.net / (586) 431-9311

Jeff Johnston / jeff@goaladvantage.com / (248) 891-1560